Piriformis - Muscle Physiology & Functional Anatomy

 

Piriformis

Anatomy

 

Origin:

  • Anterior surface of the sacrum (S2-S4)

Insertion:

  • Superior aspect of the greater trochanter



Major Arteries:

  • Inferior gluteal artery

  • Lateral sacral artery

  • Superior gluteal artery

 

Neural Innervation:

  • Nerve to the piriformis (L5, S1, & S2 nerve roots)

 

Trigger Points:

Piriformis Trigger Points   

 

 

Physiology

 

Concentric Functions:

  • Lateral (external) rotation of the thigh at the hip

  • Assist in hip extension during functional movements

 

Eccentric Functions:

  • Decelerates internal rotation of the hip

 

Isometric Function:

  • Helps stabilize the pelvis & femur during functional movements

 

Related Muscles

Antagonists:

Exercises:

 

 


More Images of the Piriformis Muscle

Piriformis

Piriformis Muscle

Piriformis Internal Palpation

Tight Shortened Piriformis

Tight Piriformis Musculature

 

 


More Information about the Piriformis Muscle

The piriformis muscle along with the quadratus femoris, gemellus superior, gemellus nferior, obturator internus & obturator externus are the primary external rotators of the hip.

 

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